Deoxyribose

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Deoxyribose is a monosaccharide primarily found in the side chains of DNA, with the molecular formula C5H10O4. The presence of deoxyribose instead of ribose is one difference between DNA and RNA. Its name indicates that it is derived from ribose sugar by the loss of an oxygen atom in the form of a hydroxyl group. The absence of a hydroxyl group causes DNA to be more resistant to hydrolysis than RNA. It also increases molecular stability in DNA.

Deoxyribose is a part of the aldopentose group, meaning it is a monosaccharide with 5 carbons, and also an aldehyde functional group in its linear structure.

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