Penicillin

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Penicillin was the first antibiotic to be discovered. Is is an irreversible inhibitor. It permanently inactivates the key enzymes in bacterial cell walls[1]. This is acheived by covalently bonding with a serine residue in glycopeptide transpetidase. If bacteria can no longer sythesise cell walls, they are prevented from growing and dividing, therefore killing the infection. Our cells do not have a cell wall so we are not harmed by Penicillin[2] .

It was in 1928 that Alexander Flemming first noted the effect of penicillium on the growth of staphyloccoci; yet it was not until 1941 that it was first used for treatment against bacterial infection.

References

  1. Berg JM, Tymoczko JL and Stryer L, 2007, Biochemistry 6th edition, NY, W. H Freeman and Company, page 109
  2. Hardin J., Bertoni G., Kleinsmith L., 2011 Beckers World Of The Cell. 8th Edition, San Fransisco: Pearson Education, page 145
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox