Anticodon

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
Revision as of 11:58, 6 December 2017 by 170471312 (Talk | contribs)
Jump to: navigation, search

The anti codon provides the intermediate between transcribed mRNA and the final product of a translated polypeptide. The three base sequence on a molecule of tRNA which is complementary to a codon on a strand of mRNA. The anti codon is located upon neither the D nor T loops of the folded tRNA structure but on the end of the loop next to the variable arm. (See fig 30.3 on referenced page)[1] The mRNA codons involved with the anti codon are read 5’-3’ [2].

The recognition of an anticodon to a codon allows an amino acid to be brought to a elongating strand of protein and joined to it.

The first two bases must be completely complementary to the codon to allow hydrogen bonds to form between the base pairs, the third base may be non-complementry or modified base (i.e. inosine) but will still form a hydrogen bond between the anticodon and codon[3] This is known as the ‘Wobble Hypothesis’ proposed by Francis Crick [4]. Due to this property It is down to the anti-codon that the host tRNA may recognise multiple codons.

References

  1. Stryer et al (2012) Biochemistry, 7th Edition, New York, Palgrave Macmillan pp924
  2. Stryer et al (2012) Biochemistry, 7th Edition, New York, Palgrave Macmillan pp922
  3. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edn, Alberts et al., 2008
  4. Stryer et al (2012) Biochemistry, 7th Edition, New York, Palgrave Macmillan pp925
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox