Autosomal dominant

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
 
Line 1: Line 1:
The autosomes are all the chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell, except the sex chromosomes.<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 749</ref>  
+
The autosomes are all the [[chromosomes|chromosomes]] in the nucleus of a cell, except the [[sex chromosome|sex chromosomes]]&nbsp;<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 749</ref>.
  
Dominance, is when a heterozygote will express a trait in its phenotype, in the same way a homozygote will for that allele. &nbsp;The allele and its phenotypic trait is therefore said to be dominant.<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 754</ref> &nbsp;  
+
[[Dominance|Dominance]], is when a [[heterozygote|heterozygote]] will express a trait in its [[phenotype|phenotype]], in the same way a [[homozygote|homozygote]] will for that [[allele|allele]]. &nbsp;The allele and its phenotypic trait is therefore said to be dominant&nbsp;<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 754</ref>. &nbsp;  
  
Therefore, an autosomal dominant individual will have either two mutant alleles, or one mutant allele and one wild type allele, but as the mutation is dominant, the mutant allele will be expressed in the phenotype regardless, unless they inherit two recessive wild type alleles. &nbsp;  
+
Therefore, an autosomal dominant individual will have either two mutant [[alleles|alleles]], or one mutant allele and one wild type allele, but as the mutation is dominant, the mutant allele will be expressed in the phenotype regardless, unless they inherit two recessive wild type alleles. &nbsp;  
  
Also, if the individual were to have offspring, and they were heterozygous for the mutation, the offspring will have a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. &nbsp;If however, the parent is homozygous for the mutation, then regardless of the other parents genptype, the offspring will express the mutation in the phenotype as it is dominant.<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Pages 97 and 98</ref>  
+
Also, if the individual were to have offspring, and they were heterozygous for the mutation, the offspring will have a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation. &nbsp;If however, the parent is homozygous for the mutation, then regardless of the other parents [[genotype|genotype]], the offspring will express the mutation in the phenotype as it is dominant.<ref>Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Pages 97 and 98</ref>  
  
 
=== References:  ===
 
=== References:  ===
  
 
<references />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
 
<references />&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;

Latest revision as of 16:38, 30 November 2012

The autosomes are all the chromosomes in the nucleus of a cell, except the sex chromosomes [1].

Dominance, is when a heterozygote will express a trait in its phenotype, in the same way a homozygote will for that allele.  The allele and its phenotypic trait is therefore said to be dominant [2].  

Therefore, an autosomal dominant individual will have either two mutant alleles, or one mutant allele and one wild type allele, but as the mutation is dominant, the mutant allele will be expressed in the phenotype regardless, unless they inherit two recessive wild type alleles.  

Also, if the individual were to have offspring, and they were heterozygous for the mutation, the offspring will have a 50% chance of inheriting the mutation.  If however, the parent is homozygous for the mutation, then regardless of the other parents genotype, the offspring will express the mutation in the phenotype as it is dominant.[3]

References:

  1. Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 749
  2. Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Page 754
  3. Hartl.D et al. (2012) Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes, Eighth edition: Pages 97 and 98
   
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox