Cytotoxic T-cells

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Also known as a killer T-cell. These cells kill host cells that have become&nbsp;infected by some sort of intracellular [[Pathogen|pathogen]]&nbsp;<ref>alberts, B (2008). molecular biology of the cell. USA: garland science. glossary</ref>.  
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Also known as a killer T-cell. These cells kill host cells that have become&nbsp;infected by some sort of intracellular [[Pathogen|pathogen]]<ref>alberts, B (2008). molecular biology of the cell. USA: garland science. glossary</ref>.  
  
The cytotoxic T-cells can trigger an endogeneous pathway within the target cell leading to [[Apoptosis|apoptosis]]. This is due to the cytotoxic T-cells releasing "preformed effector molecules" <ref>Janeway CA Jr, et al.;2001</ref><ref>Janeway C. Immunobiologie. 5th ed. Paris: De Boeck; 2003.</ref>  
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The cytotoxic T-cells can trigger an endogeneous pathway within the target cell leading to [[Apoptosis|apoptosis]]. This is due to the cytotoxic T-cells releasing "preformed effector molecules"<ref>Janeway CA Jr, et al.;2001</ref><ref>Janeway C. Immunobiologie. 5th ed. Paris: De Boeck; 2003.</ref>.
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Revision as of 19:53, 4 December 2017

Also known as a killer T-cell. These cells kill host cells that have become infected by some sort of intracellular pathogen[1].

The cytotoxic T-cells can trigger an endogeneous pathway within the target cell leading to apoptosis. This is due to the cytotoxic T-cells releasing "preformed effector molecules"[2][3].

References

  1. alberts, B (2008). molecular biology of the cell. USA: garland science. glossary
  2. Janeway CA Jr, et al.;2001
  3. Janeway C. Immunobiologie. 5th ed. Paris: De Boeck; 2003.
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