Desmosomes

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Desmosome junctions are a type of anchoring junction. Anchoring junctions are [[Endothelial Cell-Cell Junction|cell-cell junctions]] where there is a central role played by transmembrane adhesion [[Protein|proteins]] that span the membrane. One end of the protein links to the [[Cytoskeleton|cytoskeleton]] inside the cell whereas the other end links to other structures outside the cell. They are located in the epithelial tissues and between muscle cells of animals<ref>Garrod D, Chidgey M. Desmosome structure, composition and function. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1778 (2008) 572–587</ref>. There are two types of anchoring junctions: [[Adherens junction|adherens junction]] and desmosome junctions <ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
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Desmosome junctions are a type of anchoring junction. Anchoring junctions are [[Endothelial Cell-Cell Junction|cell-cell junctions]] where there is a central role played by transmembrane adhesion [[Protein|proteins]] that span the membrane. One end of the protein links to the [[Cytoskeleton|cytoskeleton]] inside the cell whereas the other end links to other structures outside the cell. They are located in the epithelial tissues and between muscle cells of animals<ref>Garrod D, Chidgey M. Desmosome structure, composition and function. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1778 (2008) 572–587</ref>. There are two types of anchoring junctions: [[Adherens junction|adherens junction]] and desmosome junctions<ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
  
In desmosome junctions, a bundle of [[Intermediate filament|intermediate filaments]] is attached to a plaque of anchor proteins. Also attached to the plaque are transmembrane adhesion proteins of the [[Cadherin proteins|cadherin]] family which hold the adjacent membranes together. These proteins are desmoglein and desmocollin <ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
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In desmosome junctions, a bundle of [[Intermediate filament|intermediate filaments]] is attached to a plaque of anchor proteins. Also attached to the plaque are transmembrane adhesion proteins of the [[Cadherin proteins|cadherin]] family which hold the adjacent membranes together. These proteins are desmoglein and desmocollin<ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
  
The main function of desmosome junctions is to provide mechanical strength to the cell. If the desmosome junction is disrupted, for example by [[Antibodies|antibodies]] which cause defective adhesion, severe blistering of the skin can occur<ref>Garrod, D., Chidgey, M. (2007). Desmosome structure, composition and function. Science Direct .</ref>. The plaque made up of anchor proteins is linked to the intermediate filaments (usually comprised of [[Alpha keratin|alpha keratin]]) between cells, creating a network throughout the tissue. The network is maintained by desmosome junctions clustering together, to form adhesion belts<ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts and Peter Walter in Molecular Biology of the Cell fifth editiom</ref> which further increase their ability to provide mechanical strength <ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
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The main function of desmosome junctions is to provide mechanical strength to the cell. If the desmosome junction is disrupted, for example by [[Antibodies|antibodies]] which cause defective adhesion, severe blistering of the skin can occur<ref>Garrod, D., Chidgey, M. (2007). Desmosome structure, composition and function. Science Direct .</ref>. The plaque made up of anchor proteins is linked to the intermediate filaments (usually comprised of [[Alpha keratin|alpha keratin]]) between cells, creating a network throughout the tissue. The network is maintained by desmosome junctions clustering together, to form adhesion belts<ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts and Peter Walter in Molecular Biology of the Cell fifth editiom</ref>. which further increase their ability to provide mechanical strength<ref>Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.</ref>.  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Latest revision as of 18:01, 6 December 2018

Desmosome junctions are a type of anchoring junction. Anchoring junctions are cell-cell junctions where there is a central role played by transmembrane adhesion proteins that span the membrane. One end of the protein links to the cytoskeleton inside the cell whereas the other end links to other structures outside the cell. They are located in the epithelial tissues and between muscle cells of animals[1]. There are two types of anchoring junctions: adherens junction and desmosome junctions[2].

In desmosome junctions, a bundle of intermediate filaments is attached to a plaque of anchor proteins. Also attached to the plaque are transmembrane adhesion proteins of the cadherin family which hold the adjacent membranes together. These proteins are desmoglein and desmocollin[3].

The main function of desmosome junctions is to provide mechanical strength to the cell. If the desmosome junction is disrupted, for example by antibodies which cause defective adhesion, severe blistering of the skin can occur[4]. The plaque made up of anchor proteins is linked to the intermediate filaments (usually comprised of alpha keratin) between cells, creating a network throughout the tissue. The network is maintained by desmosome junctions clustering together, to form adhesion belts[5]. which further increase their ability to provide mechanical strength[6].

References

  1. Garrod D, Chidgey M. Desmosome structure, composition and function. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta 1778 (2008) 572–587
  2. Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.
  3. Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.
  4. Garrod, D., Chidgey, M. (2007). Desmosome structure, composition and function. Science Direct .
  5. Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts and Peter Walter in Molecular Biology of the Cell fifth editiom
  6. Alberts, B., Johnson, A., Lewis, J., Raff, M., Roberts, K., Walter, P. (2007). Molecular Biology of the cell (Fifth ed.). Garland Science.
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