Disaccharides

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Good edit. Added some links.)
(link and grammar)
 
Line 1: Line 1:
A Diasaccharide, is a carbohydrate molecules which consist two units of [[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]] molecules bound together by a [[Glycosidic_bond|glycosidic bond]].<br>  
+
A Diasaccharide, is a [[Carbohydrate|carbohydrate]] molecule, which consists of two units of [[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]] molecules bound together by a [[Glycosidic bond|glycosidic bond]].<br>
  
 
Some common examples of disaccharides are:  
 
Some common examples of disaccharides are:  
Line 8: Line 8:
 
*[[Maltose]] (made up of 2 glucose monosaccarides)
 
*[[Maltose]] (made up of 2 glucose monosaccarides)
  
In lactose and maltose, an alpha [[1,4 glycosidic bond|1,4-glycosidic bond]] is formed between the two monosaccharides, resulting from the linkage of the alpha-anomeric form of C-1 on one sugar and the hydroxyl oxygen on the C-4 of the other sugar<ref>Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2012) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: W.H. Freeman. pg 337</ref>.<br>  
+
In lactose and maltose, an alpha [[1,4 glycosidic bond|1,4-glycosidic bond]] is formed between the two monosaccharides, resulting from the linkage of the alpha-anomeric form of C-1 on one sugar and the [[Hydroxyl|hydroxyl]] oxygen on the C-4 of the other sugar<ref>Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2012) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: W.H. Freeman. pg 337</ref>.<br>
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
<references /><br>
 
<references /><br>

Latest revision as of 11:30, 5 December 2017

A Diasaccharide, is a carbohydrate molecule, which consists of two units of monosaccharide molecules bound together by a glycosidic bond.

Some common examples of disaccharides are:

In lactose and maltose, an alpha 1,4-glycosidic bond is formed between the two monosaccharides, resulting from the linkage of the alpha-anomeric form of C-1 on one sugar and the hydroxyl oxygen on the C-4 of the other sugar[1].

References

  1. Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2012) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: W.H. Freeman. pg 337

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox