Disjunction

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Disjunction is a process which sees [[homologous chromosomes|homologous chromosomes]], that are lined up along the [[equatorial plate|equatorial plate]], gradually drawn towards opposite poles of a [[Cell|cell]], by structures known as [[Spindle fibres|spindle fibres]]. The process of disjunction occurs in both mitosis and [[Meiosis|meiosis]] cell division and is associated with the [[anaphase|anaphase]] stage. During the process, If two sister [[chromatids|chromatids]] do not seperate correctly, then this leads to an incorrect number of chromosomes, in one of the two dividing cells, and this is known as [[Aneuploidy]].
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Disjunction is a process which sees [[Homologous chromosomes|homologous chromosomes]], that are lined up along the [[Equatorial plate|equatorial plate]], gradually drawn towards opposite poles of a [[Cell|cell]], by structures known as [[Spindle fibres|spindle fibres]]. The process of disjunction occurs in both mitosis and [[Meiosis|meiosis]] cell division and is associated with the [[Anaphase|anaphase]] stage. If two sister [[Chromatids|chromatids]] do not separate correctly during the process, nondisjunction occurs. This then leads to an incorrect number of chromosomes, in one of the two dividing cells, and this is known as [[Aneuploidy]].

Revision as of 17:04, 17 November 2011

Disjunction is a process which sees homologous chromosomes, that are lined up along the equatorial plate, gradually drawn towards opposite poles of a cell, by structures known as spindle fibres. The process of disjunction occurs in both mitosis and meiosis cell division and is associated with the anaphase stage. If two sister chromatids do not separate correctly during the process, nondisjunction occurs. This then leads to an incorrect number of chromosomes, in one of the two dividing cells, and this is known as Aneuploidy.

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