Dynein

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A eukaryotic [[Motor_protein|motor protein]] which uses [[ATP]] energy to drive the movement of [[Organelles]] or structures of a [[Eukaryotic cell]]&nbsp;<ref> Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223</ref>.<br>
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A eukaryotic [[Motor protein|motor protein]] which uses [[ATP]] energy to drive the movement of [[Organelles]] or structures of a [[Eukaryotic cell]]<ref> Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223</ref>.  
  
There are two major groups of dyneins. One major group being the axonemal dyneins which are responsible for the movement in cilia and flagella. The other major group is the cytoplasmic dyneins which move membrane-bound organelles, such as transport [[Vesicles]], along [[Microtubule|microtubules]] towards the proximal (minus) end of the [[Microtubule]]&nbsp;<ref>Alberts. B., Johnson. A., Lewis. J., Raff. M., Roberts. K and Walter. P, (2008); Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science, Taylor &amp;amp; Francis Group, pp 1014-1015</ref>.  
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There are two major groups of dyneins. One major group being the axonemal dyneins which are responsible for the movement in cilia and flagella. The other major group is the cytoplasmic dyneins which move membrane-bound organelles, such as transport [[Vesicles]], along [[Microtubule|microtubules]] towards the proximal (minus) end of the [[Microtubule]]<ref>Alberts. B., Johnson. A., Lewis. J., Raff. M., Roberts. K and Walter. P, (2008); Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science, Taylor &amp;amp;amp;amp; Francis Group, pp 1014-1015</ref>.  
  
This direction of movement is opposite to the movement of membrane-bound [[Organelles]] that are attached to [[Kinesin|kinesins]] which move towards the plus end of the [[Microtubule]]&nbsp;<ref> Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223</ref>.<br>
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This direction of movement is opposite to the movement of membrane-bound [[Organelles]] that are attached to [[Kinesin|kinesins]] which move towards the plus end of the [[Microtubule]]<ref> Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223</ref>.  
  
=== References<br> ===
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=== References  ===
  
<references /><br>
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<references />

Latest revision as of 16:27, 7 December 2018

A eukaryotic motor protein which uses ATP energy to drive the movement of Organelles or structures of a Eukaryotic cell[1].

There are two major groups of dyneins. One major group being the axonemal dyneins which are responsible for the movement in cilia and flagella. The other major group is the cytoplasmic dyneins which move membrane-bound organelles, such as transport Vesicles, along microtubules towards the proximal (minus) end of the Microtubule[2].

This direction of movement is opposite to the movement of membrane-bound Organelles that are attached to kinesins which move towards the plus end of the Microtubule[3].

References

  1. Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223
  2. Alberts. B., Johnson. A., Lewis. J., Raff. M., Roberts. K and Walter. P, (2008); Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science, Taylor &amp;amp;amp; Francis Group, pp 1014-1015
  3. Hickman.M and Thain.M, (2004) Dictionary of Biology, 11th edition, London: Penguin Group, pp 223
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