Element

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "In chemical terms, a single element is composed of only one type of atom, and cannot be broken down any further into its sub-atomic parts. All the types of elements we are a...")
 
Line 1: Line 1:
In chemical terms, a single element is composed of only one type&nbsp;of atom, and cannot be broken down any further into its sub-atomic parts. All the types of elements we are aware of are ordered by their atomic number in the periodic table; this can help to demonstrate trends of elements with similar chemical properties also in their group (a<span id="fck_dom_range_temp_1322160055801_651" /> vertical column) or period (a horizontal row).
+
In chemical terms, a single element is composed of only one type&nbsp;of atom, and cannot be broken down any further into its sub-atomic parts. All the types of elements we are aware of are ordered by their atomic number in the periodic table; this can help to demonstrate trends of elements with similar chemical properties also in their group (a vertical column) or period (a horizontal row).  
  
 
An example of an extremely abundant element is hydrogen (H). Hydrogen is the first element in the periodic table, with one electron and one proton in its nucleus; however, it contains no neutrons. This means that its electronic configuration is 1s<sup>1</sup>.
 
An example of an extremely abundant element is hydrogen (H). Hydrogen is the first element in the periodic table, with one electron and one proton in its nucleus; however, it contains no neutrons. This means that its electronic configuration is 1s<sup>1</sup>.

Revision as of 18:51, 24 November 2011

In chemical terms, a single element is composed of only one type of atom, and cannot be broken down any further into its sub-atomic parts. All the types of elements we are aware of are ordered by their atomic number in the periodic table; this can help to demonstrate trends of elements with similar chemical properties also in their group (a vertical column) or period (a horizontal row).

An example of an extremely abundant element is hydrogen (H). Hydrogen is the first element in the periodic table, with one electron and one proton in its nucleus; however, it contains no neutrons. This means that its electronic configuration is 1s1.

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox