Energy

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It is something that an object needs to do work. The standard unit of energy is the Joule (J) which is defined as the energy exerted on an object by a force of one Newton over a distance of one metre. The first law of Thermodynamics states that energy cannot be created nor destroyed and is instead transformed from one form to another<ref>Encyclopædia Britannica. Energy Conversion. 2016 [cited 23/10/17]; Available from: https://www.britannica.com/technology/energy-conversion</ref>. Energy can be caluclated through the equation E= mc<sup>2&nbsp; </sup>where m is the mass of an object and c the speed of light within a vacuum.<br>  
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It is something that an object needs to do work. The standard unit of energy is the [[Joule|Joule]] (J) which is defined as the energy exerted on an object by a force of one [[Newton|Newton]] over a distance of one [[metre|metre]]. The first law of [[Thermodynamics|Thermodynamics]] states that energy cannot be created nor destroyed and is instead transformed from one form to another<ref>Encyclopædia Britannica. Energy Conversion. 2016 [cited 23/10/17]; Available from: https://www.britannica.com/technology/energy-conversion</ref>. Energy can be caluclated through the equation E= mc<sup>2&nbsp; </sup>where m is the [[mass|mass]] of an object and c the [[speed of light|speed of light]] within a [[vacuum|vacuum]].<br>  
  
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=== References ===
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Latest revision as of 13:14, 17 December 2018

It is something that an object needs to do work. The standard unit of energy is the Joule (J) which is defined as the energy exerted on an object by a force of one Newton over a distance of one metre. The first law of Thermodynamics states that energy cannot be created nor destroyed and is instead transformed from one form to another[1]. Energy can be caluclated through the equation E= mcwhere m is the mass of an object and c the speed of light within a vacuum.

References

  1. Encyclopædia Britannica. Energy Conversion. 2016 [cited 23/10/17]; Available from: https://www.britannica.com/technology/energy-conversion
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