Furanose

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(Added the references correctly, that is, I added them as explained in the lecture. Cleaned up the text.)
 
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A furanose is a [[Carbohydrate|carbohydrate]]&nbsp;[[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]]&nbsp;that is a five-membered (5 [[Carbon|carbon]]) ring. The name furanose is due to its similarity to [[Furan|furan]]<ref>Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2011) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 333</ref>. Furanose is formed from the open-chain form of fructose cyclized to a five-membered ring when the C-5 hydroxyl group attacks the C-2 ketone to form an intramolecular hemiketal. Two anomers are possible, which are&nbsp;α anomer and β anomer.<br>  
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A furanose is a [[Carbohydrate|carbohydrate]]&nbsp;[[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]]&nbsp;that is a five-membered (5 [[Carbon|carbon]]) ring. The name furanose is due to its similarity to [[Furan|furan]]<ref>Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2011) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 333</ref>. Furanose is formed from the open-chain form of fructose cyclized to a five-membered ring when the C-5 hydroxyl group attacks the C-2 [[ketone|ketone]] to form an intramolecular hemiketal. Two anomers are possible, which are&nbsp;α anomer and β anomer<ref>Berg J., Tymoczko J, Gregory J. Gatto, Jr. and Stryer L. (2015) Biochemistry, 8th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 319</ref>.<br>  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
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2. Berg J., Tymoczko J, Gregory J. Gatto, Jr. and Stryer L. (2015) Biochemistry, 8th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 319<br>
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Latest revision as of 22:17, 4 December 2017

A furanose is a carbohydrate monosaccharide that is a five-membered (5 carbon) ring. The name furanose is due to its similarity to furan[1]. Furanose is formed from the open-chain form of fructose cyclized to a five-membered ring when the C-5 hydroxyl group attacks the C-2 ketone to form an intramolecular hemiketal. Two anomers are possible, which are α anomer and β anomer[2].

References

  1. Berg J., Tymoczko J and Stryer L. (2011) Biochemistry, 7th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 333
  2. Berg J., Tymoczko J, Gregory J. Gatto, Jr. and Stryer L. (2015) Biochemistry, 8th edition, New York: WH Freeman. pg 319

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