GLUT transporter

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GLUT transporters are an example of [[Uniport carrier|uniport carrier]] proteins<ref>Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.</ref>.&nbsp;They are [[Integral membrane proteins|integral membrane proteins]]&nbsp;that are responsible for the f[[Facilitated diffusion|acilitated diffusion]] of glucose into cells such as erythrocytes ([[GLUT1|GLUT1]]) and liver cells ([[GLUT2|GLUT2]])<ref>Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.</ref>. It can allow glucose to move into cells when concentration is high in the [[Plasma|plasma]]&nbsp;(but low intracellular levels) or remove it from cells where plasma glucose concentration is low and extracellular levels are high.&nbsp;GLUT transporters are not active transporters, they make use of the [[Electrochemical gradient|chemical gradient that]] exists between the inside and outside of the [[Plasma membrane|plasma membrane<ref>Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.</ref>]].&nbsp;<br>  
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GLUT transporters are an example of [[Uniport carrier|uniport carrier]] proteins<ref>Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.</ref>.&nbsp;They are [[Integral membrane proteins|integral membrane proteins]]&nbsp;that are responsible for the [[Facilitated_diffusion|facilitated diffusion]] of glucose into cells such as erythrocytes ([[GLUT1|GLUT1]]) and liver cells ([[GLUT2|GLUT2]])<ref>Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.</ref>. It can allow glucose to move into cells when concentration is high in the [[Plasma|plasma]]&nbsp;(but low intracellular levels) or remove it from cells where plasma glucose concentration is low and extracellular levels are high.&nbsp;GLUT transporters are passive transporters, whereby they make use of the [[Electrochemical gradient|chemical gradient]]&nbsp;that&nbsp;exists between the inside and outside of the [[Plasma membrane|plasma membrane<ref>Lodish H. Berk A. Zipursky SL. Matsudaira P. Baltimore D. Darnell J. Molecular Cell Biology. 4th Ed. New York: W. H. Freeman; 2000</ref>]].&nbsp;<br>  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Revision as of 10:49, 20 November 2017

GLUT transporters are an example of uniport carrier proteins[1]. They are integral membrane proteins that are responsible for the facilitated diffusion of glucose into cells such as erythrocytes (GLUT1) and liver cells (GLUT2)[2]. It can allow glucose to move into cells when concentration is high in the plasma (but low intracellular levels) or remove it from cells where plasma glucose concentration is low and extracellular levels are high. GLUT transporters are passive transporters, whereby they make use of the chemical gradient that exists between the inside and outside of the plasma membraneUNIQ48faf32d39ef89b-nowiki-00000007-QINU3UNIQ48faf32d39ef89b-nowiki-00000008-QINU

References

  1. Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.
  2. Becker W, Kleinsmith L, Hardin J (2004). The World of the Cell, 6th edition, p201. San Francisco: Pearson Education.
  3. Lodish H. Berk A. Zipursky SL. Matsudaira P. Baltimore D. Darnell J. Molecular Cell Biology. 4th Ed. New York: W. H. Freeman; 2000
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