Galactose

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Created page with "Galactose is a monosaccharide, similar in structure to glucose, with the same structural formula C<sub>6</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>6.</sub>It is far less common in nature than glu...")
 
 
(3 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
Galactose is a monosaccharide, similar in structure to glucose, with the same structural formula C<sub>6</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>6.</sub>It is far less common in nature than glucose, however is dehydrated in a reaction with glucose to form lactose, a common disaccharide found in milk. Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose as although it has the same numbers of each atoms, the way that these atoms are arranged in space, (stereoisomerism), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.
+
[[Image:2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png|right|200pxpx|2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png]]
 +
 
 +
Galactose is a [[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]], similar in structure to [[Glucose|glucose]], with the same structural formula C<sub>6</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>6.</sub>  
 +
 
 +
Condensation of Galactose and Glucose will form [[Lactose|lactose]], a common [[Disaccharide|disaccharide]] found in milk.  
 +
 
 +
Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose <ref>Biochemistry 7th (2002) Stryer et.al. pg331-332</ref>&nbsp;although it has the same numbers of [[Atom|atoms]]. The way that these atoms are arranged in space, ([[Stereoisomerism|stereoisomerism]]), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.<br>
 +
 
 +
=== Reference  ===
 +
 
 +
<references />

Latest revision as of 17:50, 4 December 2016

2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png

Galactose is a monosaccharide, similar in structure to glucose, with the same structural formula C6H12O6.

Condensation of Galactose and Glucose will form lactose, a common disaccharide found in milk.

Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose [1] although it has the same numbers of atoms. The way that these atoms are arranged in space, (stereoisomerism), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.

Reference

  1. Biochemistry 7th (2002) Stryer et.al. pg331-332
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox