Galactose

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Galactose is a [[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]], similar in structure to [[Glucose|glucose]], with the same structural formula C<sub>6</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>6.</sub>It is far less common in nature than [[Glucose|glucose]], however is dehydrated in a reaction with glucose to form [[lactose|lactose]], a common [[disaccharide|disaccharide]] found in milk. Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose as although it has the same numbers of each [[Atom|atoms]], the way that these atoms are arranged in space, ([[stereoisomerism|stereoisomerism]]), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.
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[[Image:2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png|right|200pxpx|2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png]]
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Galactose is a [[Monosaccharide|monosaccharide]], similar in structure to [[Glucose|glucose]], with the same structural formula C<sub>6</sub>H<sub>12</sub>O<sub>6.</sub>  
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Condensation of Galactose and Glucose will form [[Lactose|lactose]], a common [[Disaccharide|disaccharide]] found in milk.  
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Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose <ref>Biochemistry 7th (2002) Stryer et.al. pg331-332</ref>&nbsp;although it has the same numbers of [[Atom|atoms]]. The way that these atoms are arranged in space, ([[Stereoisomerism|stereoisomerism]]), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.<br>
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=== Reference  ===
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<references />

Latest revision as of 17:50, 4 December 2016

2000px-DL-Galactose.svg.png

Galactose is a monosaccharide, similar in structure to glucose, with the same structural formula C6H12O6.

Condensation of Galactose and Glucose will form lactose, a common disaccharide found in milk.

Galactose is often described as a C4 epimer of glucose [1] although it has the same numbers of atoms. The way that these atoms are arranged in space, (stereoisomerism), is different, and as such they are both non-superimposable mirror images of one another.

Reference

  1. Biochemistry 7th (2002) Stryer et.al. pg331-332
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