Genetic Map

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Genetic Map is a diagrammatic view of the linear sequence of [[Genes|genes]] in a [[Chromosome|chromosome]] where the space between adjacent genes is corresponding to the rate of [[Recombination|recombination]] (result of crossing over between [[Homologous chromosomes|homologous chromosomes]]) between them. Genetic mapping has been a vital procedure to separate off and categorise the mutant genes which cause [[Hereditary disease|hereditary diseases]]. Once the position of [[Mutant gene|mutant gene]] has been located, then it can be used to identify the disease gene and to study its roles.  
 
Genetic Map is a diagrammatic view of the linear sequence of [[Genes|genes]] in a [[Chromosome|chromosome]] where the space between adjacent genes is corresponding to the rate of [[Recombination|recombination]] (result of crossing over between [[Homologous chromosomes|homologous chromosomes]]) between them. Genetic mapping has been a vital procedure to separate off and categorise the mutant genes which cause [[Hereditary disease|hereditary diseases]]. Once the position of [[Mutant gene|mutant gene]] has been located, then it can be used to identify the disease gene and to study its roles.  
  
The unit of distance in genetic map is called a map unit where one map unit is a&nbsp;[[Centimorgan|centimorgan]]&nbsp;(''cM'') <ref>Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012), Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes; Jones &amp;amp; Bartlett Learning, 8th Edition</ref><br>  
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The unit of distance in genetic map is called a map unit (m.u.) or a centimorgan (cM).<ref>Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012), Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes; Jones &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Bartlett Learning, 8th Edition</ref>&nbsp;The distance can be found by the equation (Number of recombinant organisms / Total number of organisms)*100.<ref>North Dakota State University, Phillip McClean. Recombination and Estimating the Distance Between Genes. 1997 [cited 4/12/2016] Available from: https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~mcclean/plsc431/linkage/linkage2.htm</ref><br>  
  
 
=== Reference  ===
 
=== Reference  ===
  
 
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Revision as of 20:16, 4 December 2016

Genetic Map is a diagrammatic view of the linear sequence of genes in a chromosome where the space between adjacent genes is corresponding to the rate of recombination (result of crossing over between homologous chromosomes) between them. Genetic mapping has been a vital procedure to separate off and categorise the mutant genes which cause hereditary diseases. Once the position of mutant gene has been located, then it can be used to identify the disease gene and to study its roles.

The unit of distance in genetic map is called a map unit (m.u.) or a centimorgan (cM).[1] The distance can be found by the equation (Number of recombinant organisms / Total number of organisms)*100.[2]

Reference

  1. Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012), Genetics Analysis of Genes and Genomes; Jones &amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp;amp; Bartlett Learning, 8th Edition
  2. North Dakota State University, Phillip McClean. Recombination and Estimating the Distance Between Genes. 1997 [cited 4/12/2016] Available from: https://www.ndsu.edu/pubweb/~mcclean/plsc431/linkage/linkage2.htm

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