Glycine

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Glycine is one of the 20 [[Amino acids|amino acids]].&nbsp; It's three letter code is Gly, and it's [[Single letter amino acid codes|single letter code]]&nbsp;is G.&nbsp;It is the simplest [[Amino acids|amino acid]], with a [[Hydrogen|hydrogen]] atom&nbsp;as a side chain&nbsp;- this means glycine is the only [[Amino acids|amino acid]] which does not have a [[Chiral carbon|chiral]] [[Carbon|carbon]] [[Atom|atom]]&nbsp;<ref name="Glycine">Priv.-Doz. B. Kirste. (01-23-1998). Glycine. Available: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemistry/bio/aminoacid/glycin_en.html. Last accessed 23-11-2010.</ref>, so it does not form [[stereoisomer|stereoisomers]] therefore&nbsp;will not have L or D configurations.  
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Glycine is one of the 20 [[Amino acids|amino acids]].&nbsp; It's three letter code is Gly, and it's [[Single letter amino acid codes|single letter code]]&nbsp;is G.&nbsp;It is the simplest [[Amino acids|amino acid]], with a [[Hydrogen|hydrogen]] atom&nbsp;as a side chain&nbsp;- this means glycine is the only [[Amino acids|amino acid]] which does not have a [[Chiral carbon|chiral]] [[Carbon|carbon]] [[Atom|atom]]&nbsp;<ref name="Glycine">Priv.-Doz. B. Kirste. (01-23-1998). Glycine. Available: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemistry/bio/aminoacid/glycin_en.html. Last accessed 23-11-2010.</ref>, so it does not form [[Stereoisomer|stereoisomers]] therefore&nbsp;will not have L or D configurations.  
  
 
Glycine has a function outside of the [[Cell|cell]]. It plays a vital role in the [[Central nervous system|central nervous system]] as is acts as a [[Neurotransmitter|neurotransmitter]]&nbsp;in chemical synapses&nbsp;<ref>Molecular biology of the cell,4th edition, 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson , Julian Lewis, Martin Raff , Keith Roberts and Peter Walter. Page 764</ref>.<br>  
 
Glycine has a function outside of the [[Cell|cell]]. It plays a vital role in the [[Central nervous system|central nervous system]] as is acts as a [[Neurotransmitter|neurotransmitter]]&nbsp;in chemical synapses&nbsp;<ref>Molecular biology of the cell,4th edition, 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson , Julian Lewis, Martin Raff , Keith Roberts and Peter Walter. Page 764</ref>.<br>  
  
Glycine has two [[Hydrogen|hydrogens]] attatched to the [[alpha carbon|alpha carbon]] and is found in flexible areas of proteins due to its short side chain <ref>http://www.acnp.org/g4/gn401000008/default.htm</ref>.  
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Glycine has two [[Hydrogen|hydrogens]] attatched to the [[Alpha carbon|alpha carbon]] and is found in flexible areas of proteins due to its short side chain <ref>http://www.acnp.org/g4/gn401000008/default.htm</ref><ref>Berg, J. M., Tymoczko, J. L., &amp; Stryer, L. (2002). Biochemistry (5th ed.). New York: W.H. Freeman</ref>.  
  
[[Image:Glycine.png]]
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[[Image:Glycine.png]]  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
Berg, J. M., Tymoczko, J. L., &amp; Stryer, L. (2002). Biochemistry (5th ed.). New York: W.H. Freeman.<br>
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<references /><br>

Revision as of 03:01, 30 November 2013

Glycine is one of the 20 amino acids.  It's three letter code is Gly, and it's single letter code is G. It is the simplest amino acid, with a hydrogen atom as a side chain - this means glycine is the only amino acid which does not have a chiral carbon atom [1], so it does not form stereoisomers therefore will not have L or D configurations.

Glycine has a function outside of the cell. It plays a vital role in the central nervous system as is acts as a neurotransmitter in chemical synapses [2].

Glycine has two hydrogens attatched to the alpha carbon and is found in flexible areas of proteins due to its short side chain [3][4].

Glycine.png

References

  1. Priv.-Doz. B. Kirste. (01-23-1998). Glycine. Available: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemistry/bio/aminoacid/glycin_en.html. Last accessed 23-11-2010.
  2. Molecular biology of the cell,4th edition, 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson , Julian Lewis, Martin Raff , Keith Roberts and Peter Walter. Page 764
  3. http://www.acnp.org/g4/gn401000008/default.htm
  4. Berg, J. M., Tymoczko, J. L., & Stryer, L. (2002). Biochemistry (5th ed.). New York: W.H. Freeman

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