Gram-positive

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Gram-positive cells constitute a major prokaryotic lineage in which cells contain peptidoglycan within their cell walls. Such cells will stain purple-violet under the Gram stain procedure. Examples include rod-shaped Bacillus and sphrerical Streptococcus cells &nbsp;<ref name="Brock Biology of Microorganisms">Michael Madigan, John Martinko, David Stahl, David Clark. (2012) Brock Biology of Microorganisms, Thirteenth Edition, San Francisco: Pearson</ref>.  
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Gram-positive cells constitute a major prokaryotic lineage in which cells contain peptidoglycan within their cell walls. Such cells will stain purple-violet under the Gram stain procedure. Examples include rod-shaped Bacillus and sphrerical Streptococcus cells &nbsp;<ref name="Brock Biology of Microorganisms">Michael Madigan, John Martinko, David Stahl, David Clark. (2012) Brock Biology of Microorganisms, Thirteenth Edition, San Francisco: Pearson. 66-67.</ref>.  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Revision as of 11:52, 21 November 2012

Gram-positive cells constitute a major prokaryotic lineage in which cells contain peptidoglycan within their cell walls. Such cells will stain purple-violet under the Gram stain procedure. Examples include rod-shaped Bacillus and sphrerical Streptococcus cells  [1].

References

  1. Michael Madigan, John Martinko, David Stahl, David Clark. (2012) Brock Biology of Microorganisms, Thirteenth Edition, San Francisco: Pearson. 66-67.
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