H index

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The "h-index" was introduced in 2005 as a metric for estimating "the importance, significance and broad impact of a scientist's cumulative contributions." It takes into account both the number of an individual's publications and their impact on peers, as indicated by citation counts. Its creator, Jorge Hirsch (UC-San Diego) asserts that a "successful scientist" will have an h-index of 20 after 20 years; an "outstanding scientist" will have an index of 40 after 20 years; and a "truly unique individual" will have an index of 60 after 20 years or 90 after 30 years<ref>https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=57&amp;Itemid=170</ref>
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The "h-index" was introduced in 2005 as a metric for estimating "the importance, significance and broad impact of a scientist's cumulative contributions." It takes into account both the number of an individual's publications and their impact on peers, as indicated by citation counts. Its creator, Jorge Hirsch (UC-San Diego) asserts that a "successful scientist" will have an h-index of 20 after 20 years; an "outstanding scientist" will have an index of 40 after 20 years; and a "truly unique individual" will have an index of 60 after 20 years or 90 after 30 years.<ref>https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&amp;amp;amp;view=article&amp;amp;amp;id=57&amp;amp;amp;Itemid=170</ref>  
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[https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57&Itemid=170 https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=57&amp;Itemid=170]

Revision as of 15:26, 3 November 2018

The "h-index" was introduced in 2005 as a metric for estimating "the importance, significance and broad impact of a scientist's cumulative contributions." It takes into account both the number of an individual's publications and their impact on peers, as indicated by citation counts. Its creator, Jorge Hirsch (UC-San Diego) asserts that a "successful scientist" will have an h-index of 20 after 20 years; an "outstanding scientist" will have an index of 40 after 20 years; and a "truly unique individual" will have an index of 60 after 20 years or 90 after 30 years.[1]

Reference:

  1. https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&amp;amp;view=article&amp;amp;id=57&amp;amp;Itemid=170

https://library.gl.ciw.edu/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=57&Itemid=170

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