Hashimoto's thyroiditis

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&nbsp;Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease, in which the thyroid gland is gradually destroyed by antibodies. This leads to symptoms similar to those of an underactive thyroid, e.g. tiredness, weight gain and dry skin. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is usually seen in females aged 30-50, and can also be inherited. There is no cure for Hashimoto's thyroiditis, so levothyroxine is used as a thyroid hormone replacement for life<sup>[1]</sup>.<sup></sup><sub></sub><sup></sup>  
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Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an [[Autoimmune disease|autoimmune disease]], in which the [[Thyroid gland|thyroid gland]] is gradually destroyed by [[Antibodies|antibodies]]. This leads to symptoms similar to those of an underactive thyroid, e.g. tiredness, weight gain and dry skin. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is usually seen in females aged 30-50, and can also be inherited. There is no cure for Hashimoto's thyroiditis, so levothyroxine is used as a thyroid hormone replacement for life<ref>https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/thyroiditis/</ref>.
  
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=== References  ===
  
<references />1.&nbsp;https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/thyroiditis/.&nbsp;
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Latest revision as of 18:53, 22 November 2018

Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an autoimmune disease, in which the thyroid gland is gradually destroyed by antibodies. This leads to symptoms similar to those of an underactive thyroid, e.g. tiredness, weight gain and dry skin. Hashimoto's thyroiditis is usually seen in females aged 30-50, and can also be inherited. There is no cure for Hashimoto's thyroiditis, so levothyroxine is used as a thyroid hormone replacement for life[1].

References

  1. ↑ https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/thyroiditis/
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