Holocentric Chromosomes

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[[Holocentric_Chromosomes|Holocentric chromosomes ]]are unique in the fact that they contain centromeric sequences throughout the entire [[Chromatid|chromatid]]. They have been found to exist in ''[[C._elegans|Caenorhabditis Elegans]]''and constitute what is known as a diffuse [[Centromere|centromere]]. Holocentric chromosomes have the ability to allow [[Microtubules|microtubules]] to adhere at any point along the [[Chromatid|chromatid]] however their detailed function is still somewhat unknown.  
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Holocentric chromosomes are unique in the fact that they contain centromeric sequences throughout the entire [[Chromatid|chromatid]]. They have been found to exist in ''[[C. elegans|Caenorhabditis Elegans]]''and constitute what is known as a diffuse [[Centromere|centromere]]. Holocentric chromosomes have the ability to allow [[Microtubules|microtubules]] to adhere at any point along the [[Chromatid|chromatid]] however their detailed function is still somewhat unknown.  
 
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<br>Holocentric chromosomes are capable of producing fragments that will behave normally when undergoing [[Cell_division|cell division]]. Unusually, each fragment of the [[Chromosome|chromosome]] operates as a single holocentric unit, much like the larger chromosome they originated from.&nbsp;These smaller fragments are cut using x-rays.<ref>Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012). Genetics, Analysis of Genes and Genomes, eighth edition, London: Jones and Bartlett Learning, page 245</ref>
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<br>Holocentric chromosomes are capable of producing fragments that will behave normally when undergoing [[Cell division|cell division]]. Unusually, each fragment of the [[Chromosome|chromosome]] operates as a single holocentric unit, much like the larger chromosome they originated from.&nbsp;These smaller fragments are cut using x-rays.<ref>Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012). Genetics, Analysis of Genes and Genomes, eighth edition, London: Jones and Bartlett Learning, page 245</ref>
  
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=== <u>'''References'''</u>  ===
 
=== <u>'''References'''</u>  ===
  
 
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Revision as of 21:48, 25 November 2014

Holocentric chromosomes are unique in the fact that they contain centromeric sequences throughout the entire chromatid. They have been found to exist in Caenorhabditis Elegansand constitute what is known as a diffuse centromere. Holocentric chromosomes have the ability to allow microtubules to adhere at any point along the chromatid however their detailed function is still somewhat unknown.


Holocentric chromosomes are capable of producing fragments that will behave normally when undergoing cell division. Unusually, each fragment of the chromosome operates as a single holocentric unit, much like the larger chromosome they originated from. These smaller fragments are cut using x-rays.[1]



References

  1. Daniel L. Hartl and Maryellen Ruvolo (2012). Genetics, Analysis of Genes and Genomes, eighth edition, London: Jones and Bartlett Learning, page 245
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