Hydrophobic

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
m
 
Line 1: Line 1:
The term hydrophobic (hydro="[[Water|water]]", phobic="fearing") is used to describe [[Molecule|molecules]] that will not interact with [[Water|water]]. Such molecules can also be known as [[Lipophilic|lipophilic]] (fat-loving). Hydrophobic [[Molecules|molecules]] are usually neutral and [[Non-polar|non-polar]] and so will not dissolve in [[Polarity|polar]] solvents such as [[Water|water]]&nbsp;<ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science</ref>. Instead, hydrophobic molecules are inclined to group together to avoid associating with water&nbsp;<ref>Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Lubert Stryer (2007), Biochemistry 6th Edition, Page 28, New York: W. H. Freeman and Company</ref>. This is a key feature in the [[Phospholipid bilayer|phospholipid bilayers]] <ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science</ref> of [[Cell membranes|cell membranes]]. Examples of hydrophobic substances include fats, oils and [[Alkanes|alkanes]].&nbsp;  
+
The term hydrophobic (hydro="[[Water|water]]", phobic="fearing") is used to describe [[Molecule|molecules]] that will not interact with [[Water|water]]. Such molecules can also be known as [[Lipophilic|lipophilic]] (fat-loving). Hydrophobic [[Molecules|molecules]] are usually neutral and [[Non-polar|non-polar]] and so will not dissolve in [[Polarity|polar]] solvents such as [[Water|water]]<ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science</ref>. Instead, hydrophobic molecules are inclined to group together to avoid associating with water<ref>Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Lubert Stryer (2007), Biochemistry 6th Edition, Page 28, New York: W. H. Freeman and Company</ref>. This is a key feature in the [[Phospholipid bilayer|phospholipid bilayers]]<ref>Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science</ref> of [[Cell membranes|cell membranes]]. Examples of hydrophobic substances include fats, oils and [[Alkanes|alkanes]].&nbsp;  
  
 
Hydrophilic molecules are able to interact with water through&nbsp;[[Hydrogen bond|hydrogen bonding]]<ref>http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Hydrophilic</ref>.  
 
Hydrophilic molecules are able to interact with water through&nbsp;[[Hydrogen bond|hydrogen bonding]]<ref>http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Hydrophilic</ref>.  

Latest revision as of 14:51, 4 December 2018

The term hydrophobic (hydro="water", phobic="fearing") is used to describe molecules that will not interact with water. Such molecules can also be known as lipophilic (fat-loving). Hydrophobic molecules are usually neutral and non-polar and so will not dissolve in polar solvents such as water[1]. Instead, hydrophobic molecules are inclined to group together to avoid associating with water[2]. This is a key feature in the phospholipid bilayers[3] of cell membranes. Examples of hydrophobic substances include fats, oils and alkanes

Hydrophilic molecules are able to interact with water through hydrogen bonding[4].

References

  1. Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science
  2. Jeremy M. Berg, John L. Tymoczko, Lubert Stryer (2007), Biochemistry 6th Edition, Page 28, New York: W. H. Freeman and Company
  3. Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, Peter Walter, (2008) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, Page 620, New York: Garland Science
  4. http://www.biology-online.org/dictionary/Hydrophilic
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox