Le Chatelier's principle

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(Cleaned up the references. Cleaned up the text. Added some links.)
 
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 If there is a change in a system in which there is a dynamic equilibrium then the equilibrium's position moves to oppose the change. 
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If there is a change in a system in which there is a dynamic [[equilibrium|equilibrium]] then the equilibrium's position moves to oppose the change.  
  
For example, in terms of changing concentratio<span style="font-size: 13.28px;">n, if you have a reaction A + B &lt;--&gt; C + D (a reversible reaction) and you increase [A] then the equilibrium's position moves to the right as to oppose the change&nbsp;<ref>https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/equilibria/lechatelier.html</ref>&nbsp;.https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/equilibria/lechatelier.html</span>
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For example, in terms of changing concentration, if you have a reaction A + B &lt;--&gt; C + D (a reversible reaction) and you increase [A] then the equilibrium's position moves to the right as to oppose the change<ref>https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/equilibria/lechatelier.html</ref>.  
  
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=== References ===
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<references />

Latest revision as of 18:26, 4 December 2018

If there is a change in a system in which there is a dynamic equilibrium then the equilibrium's position moves to oppose the change.

For example, in terms of changing concentration, if you have a reaction A + B <--> C + D (a reversible reaction) and you increase [A] then the equilibrium's position moves to the right as to oppose the change[1].

References

  1. https://www.chemguide.co.uk/physical/equilibria/lechatelier.html
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