Ligase

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Ligase is a type of [[Enzyme|enzyme]] that forms a link between [[Carbon|carbon]] and either: [[Carbon|carbon]], [[Sulphur|sulphur]], [[Oxygen|oxygen]], or [[Nitrogen|nitrogen]]; using the [[Hydrolysis|hydrolysis]] of [[ATP|ATP]] and its high energy bond to drive formation of the new [[Covalent bond|covalent bond]]<ref>Marks D B., Marks A D., Smith C M., (1996) Basic Medical Biochemistry: A clinical Approach, 1st edition, Philadelphia; Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins</ref>. There are various types of ligases; one of the most important ones is [[DNA ligase|DNA ligase]] which joins [[DNA|DNA]] fragments via [[Phosphodiester bond|phosphodiester bonds]] and is used in processes such as DNA replication where [[Okazaki fragment|Okazaki fragments]] need to be annealed in order to complete the formation of the [[Lagging_strand|lagging strand]].  
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Ligase is a type of [[Enzyme|enzyme]] that forms a link between [[Carbon|carbon]] and either: [[Carbon|carbon]], [[Sulphur|sulphur]], [[Oxygen|oxygen]], or [[Nitrogen|nitrogen]]; using the [[Hydrolysis|hydrolysis]] of [[ATP|ATP]] and its high energy bond to drive formation of the new [[Covalent bond|covalent bond]]<ref>Marks D B., Marks A D., Smith C M., (1996) Basic Medical Biochemistry: A Clinical Approach, 1st edition, Philadelphia; Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins</ref>. There are various types of ligases; one of the most important ones is [[DNA ligase|DNA ligase]] which joins [[DNA|DNA]] fragments via [[Phosphodiester bond|phosphodiester bonds]] and is used in processes such as DNA replication where [[Okazaki fragment|Okazaki fragments]] need to be annealed in order to complete the formation of the [[Lagging strand|lagging strand]].  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Latest revision as of 09:59, 3 December 2018

Ligase is a type of enzyme that forms a link between carbon and either: carbon, sulphur, oxygen, or nitrogen; using the hydrolysis of ATP and its high energy bond to drive formation of the new covalent bond[1]. There are various types of ligases; one of the most important ones is DNA ligase which joins DNA fragments via phosphodiester bonds and is used in processes such as DNA replication where Okazaki fragments need to be annealed in order to complete the formation of the lagging strand.

References

  1. Marks D B., Marks A D., Smith C M., (1996) Basic Medical Biochemistry: A Clinical Approach, 1st edition, Philadelphia; Baltimore: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins
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