Low density lipoproteins

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Low density Lipoproteins (LDL)&nbsp;is a cholestryl ester which is the form in which [[cholesterol|cholesterol]] is transported in [[blood|blood]] <ref>Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K and Watson J. (2007)</ref><ref>Molecular Biology of the Cell; 5th Edition, Garland Publishing</ref>.  
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Low density Lipoproteins (LDL)&nbsp;is a cholestryl&nbsp;[[Ester|ester]] which is the form in which [[Cholesterol|cholesterol]] is transported in [[Blood|blood]] <ref>Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K and Watson J. (2007)</ref><ref>Molecular Biology of the Cell; 5th Edition, Garland Publishing</ref>.  
  
 
These lipoprotiens serve as useful molecuoles for maintaing the boold composition of cholesterol, keeping it within normal range as high cholesterol levels can lead to blood vessels being blocked and result in atherosclerotic plaque which can lead to strokes.  
 
These lipoprotiens serve as useful molecuoles for maintaing the boold composition of cholesterol, keeping it within normal range as high cholesterol levels can lead to blood vessels being blocked and result in atherosclerotic plaque which can lead to strokes.  
  
LDL maintain blood cholesterol level by binding with LDL receptors on cell surface membranes which can then be internalized into cell by [[Receptor-mediated_endocytosis|Receptor Mediated Endocytosis]].  
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LDL maintain blood cholesterol level by binding with LDL receptors on cell surface membranes which can then be internalized into cell by [[Receptor-mediated endocytosis|Receptor Mediated Endocytosis]].  
  
 
Process of Import:  
 
Process of Import:  
  
 
#LDL receptors are expressed on the surface of cell membrane.  
 
#LDL receptors are expressed on the surface of cell membrane.  
#Internal signals within cell cause production of [[clathirin coated pits|clathirin coated pits]], which internalize LDL receptors along with any LDL molecuoles that have bound to them.  
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#Internal signals within cell cause production of [[Clathirin coated pits|clathirin coated pits]], which internalize LDL receptors along with any LDL molecuoles that have bound to them.  
 
#Clatherin coated pits shed their coat and deliver their contents to [[Early Endosome|Early Endosome]]. Low pH in endosomes result in LDL molecuoles being released from their receptors and passed onto Lysosomes.  
 
#Clatherin coated pits shed their coat and deliver their contents to [[Early Endosome|Early Endosome]]. Low pH in endosomes result in LDL molecuoles being released from their receptors and passed onto Lysosomes.  
 
#LDL receptors are recycled back to cell surface membrane to be reused whilst discharged LDL molecuoles remain in lysosome  
 
#LDL receptors are recycled back to cell surface membrane to be reused whilst discharged LDL molecuoles remain in lysosome  
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=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
<references />&nbsp;
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<references />&nbsp;  
  
 
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Revision as of 10:51, 4 December 2015

Low density Lipoproteins (LDL) is a cholestryl ester which is the form in which cholesterol is transported in blood [1][2].

These lipoprotiens serve as useful molecuoles for maintaing the boold composition of cholesterol, keeping it within normal range as high cholesterol levels can lead to blood vessels being blocked and result in atherosclerotic plaque which can lead to strokes.

LDL maintain blood cholesterol level by binding with LDL receptors on cell surface membranes which can then be internalized into cell by Receptor Mediated Endocytosis.

Process of Import:

  1. LDL receptors are expressed on the surface of cell membrane.
  2. Internal signals within cell cause production of clathirin coated pits, which internalize LDL receptors along with any LDL molecuoles that have bound to them.
  3. Clatherin coated pits shed their coat and deliver their contents to Early Endosome. Low pH in endosomes result in LDL molecuoles being released from their receptors and passed onto Lysosomes.
  4. LDL receptors are recycled back to cell surface membrane to be reused whilst discharged LDL molecuoles remain in lysosome
  5. Cholestryl Esters in LDL are hyrdrolysed to free cholesterol molecuoles which can then be used by cell in other biochemical reaction, such as formation of cell membrane for example.

References

  1. Alberts B., Johnson A., Lewis J., Raff M., Roberts K and Watson J. (2007)
  2. Molecular Biology of the Cell; 5th Edition, Garland Publishing
 


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