Motor neuron

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A motor neuron is a type of [[Neuron|neuron]] that transmits signals from the central nervous system to muscles or glands. They tend to have a [[Myelin Sheath|myelin sheath]] around their [[Axon|axon]]. However, this varies between neurons <ref>Becker W., Hardin J., Bertoni G., and Kleinsmith L. (2012) Becker’s World Of The Cell, 8th Edition, San Francisco: Pearson Education. Page 365 366</ref>.  
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A motor neuron is a type of [[Neuron|neuron]] that transmits signals from the central nervous system to muscles or glands. They tend to have a [[Myelin Sheath|myelin sheath]] around their [[Axon|axon]]. However, this varies between neurons<ref>Becker W., Hardin J., Bertoni G., and Kleinsmith L. (2012) Becker’s World Of The Cell, 8th Edition, San Francisco: Pearson Education. Page 365 366</ref>.  
  
=== [[Image:MotorNeuron.jpg|Motor Neuron]] ===
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[[Image:MotorNeuron.jpg|left|Motor Neuron]]  
  
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The cell body contains the nucleus and most of the usual organelles. [[Dendrites|Dendrites]]&nbsp;are responsible for conducting of signals inward to the cell body; beginning near the [[Axon hillock|axon hillock]], the axon transmits signals outward. Breaks in the [[Myelin sheath|myelin sheath]], known as [[Nodes of Ranvier|nodes of Ranvier]], are concentrated regions of electrical activity. Each segment of the sheath consists of a concentric layer of membranes wrapped around the axon by a [[Schwann cell|Schwann cell]]. Each discontinuous myelin sheath around their axons insulate them electrically, therefore the electrical current which is traveling along the axon jumprs from one node of Ranvier to another<ref>Becker W., Hardin J., Bertoni G., and Kleinsmith L. (2012) Becker’s World Of The Cell, 8th Edition, San Francisco: Pearson Education. Page 366</ref>.
 
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The cell body contains the nucleus and most of the usual organelles. [[Dendrites|Dendrites]]&nbsp;are responsible for conducting of signals inward to the cell body; beginning near the axon hillock, the axon transmits signals outward. Breaks in the [[Myelin sheath|myelin sheath]], known as [[Nodes of Ranvier|nodes of Ranvier]], are concentrated regions of electrical activity. Each segment of the sheath consists of a concentric layer of membranes wrapped around the axon by a Schwann cell. Each discontinuous myelin sheath around their axons insulate them electrically, therefore the electrical current which is traveling along the axon jumprs from one node of Ranvier to another.<ref name="2">Hardin, Jeff. ”et al”. (2012: p366).Beckers World of the Cell. 8th ed. San Francisco: Pearson Education, Inc.&amp;amp;gt;</ref>  
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=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
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<references />

Latest revision as of 17:42, 22 October 2018

A motor neuron is a type of neuron that transmits signals from the central nervous system to muscles or glands. They tend to have a myelin sheath around their axon. However, this varies between neurons[1].

Motor Neuron

The cell body contains the nucleus and most of the usual organelles. Dendrites are responsible for conducting of signals inward to the cell body; beginning near the axon hillock, the axon transmits signals outward. Breaks in the myelin sheath, known as nodes of Ranvier, are concentrated regions of electrical activity. Each segment of the sheath consists of a concentric layer of membranes wrapped around the axon by a Schwann cell. Each discontinuous myelin sheath around their axons insulate them electrically, therefore the electrical current which is traveling along the axon jumprs from one node of Ranvier to another[2].

References

  1. Becker W., Hardin J., Bertoni G., and Kleinsmith L. (2012) Becker’s World Of The Cell, 8th Edition, San Francisco: Pearson Education. Page 365 366
  2. Becker W., Hardin J., Bertoni G., and Kleinsmith L. (2012) Becker’s World Of The Cell, 8th Edition, San Francisco: Pearson Education. Page 366
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