Multiple sclerosis

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Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease that affects the [[Motor neurones|motor neurones]] of the [[Central nervous system|central nervous system]]&nbsp;(CNS). It is an [[Autoimmune disease|autoimmune disease]] in which the body's own immune system destroys the [[Myelin sheaths|myelin sheaths]] surrounding the [[Axons|axons]] of CNS motor neurones<ref>Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.</ref>. Symptoms can include fatigue, difficulty when walking, blurred vision, numbness and muscle spasms or paralysis<ref>NHS Choices. Multiple Sclerosis. 2016. Available from: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/multiple-sclerosis/</ref>.  
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Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease that affects the [[Motor neurones|motor neurones]] of the [[Central nervous system|central nervous system]] (CNS). It is an [[Autoimmune disease|autoimmune disease]] in which the body's own immune system destroys the [[Myelin sheaths|myelin sheaths]] surrounding the [[Axons|axons]] of CNS motor neurones<ref>Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.</ref>. Symptoms can include fatigue, difficulty when walking, blurred vision, numbness and muscle spasms or paralysis<ref>NHS Choices. Multiple Sclerosis. 2016. Available from: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/multiple-sclerosis/</ref>.  
  
In the demyelinated regions of these neurones, the propagation of [[Action potentials|action potentials]] between successive [[Nodes of Ranvier|nodes of Ranvier]] via [[Saltatory_conduction|saltatory conduction]] is much slower than in unaffected neurones<ref>Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.</ref>. Demyelination is progressive and extensive, possibly affecting regions across the entirety of the [[Central_nervous_system|CNS]].<br>
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In the demyelinated regions of these neurones, the propagation of [[Action potentials|action potentials]] between successive [[Nodes of Ranvier|nodes of Ranvier]] via [[Saltatory conduction|saltatory conduction]] is much slower than in unaffected neurones<ref>Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.</ref>. Demyelination is progressive and extensive, possibly affecting regions across the entirety of the [[Central nervous system|CNS]].  
  
 
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Latest revision as of 20:01, 23 November 2017

Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease that affects the motor neurones of the central nervous system (CNS). It is an autoimmune disease in which the body's own immune system destroys the myelin sheaths surrounding the axons of CNS motor neurones[1]. Symptoms can include fatigue, difficulty when walking, blurred vision, numbness and muscle spasms or paralysis[2].

In the demyelinated regions of these neurones, the propagation of action potentials between successive nodes of Ranvier via saltatory conduction is much slower than in unaffected neurones[3]. Demyelination is progressive and extensive, possibly affecting regions across the entirety of the CNS.

References:

  1. Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.
  2. NHS Choices. Multiple Sclerosis. 2016. Available from: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/multiple-sclerosis/
  3. Alberts B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 2008. (5th ed). New York: Garland Science. p678.
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