Nuclear localisation sequence

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(Created page with "Nuclear localization signals are sorting signals found on protiens to be imported into the nucleus. They are, unlike most sorting sequences, not subjected the being cleaved off a...")
 
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Nuclear localization signals are sorting signals found on protiens to be imported into the nucleus. They are, unlike most sorting sequences, not subjected the being cleaved off after importation- due to the fact that many protiens are imported and exported from the nucleus several times. Because of this it is likely that nuclear localisation sequences are likely to form loops or patches rather than being found on a terminus. Nuclear localisation sequences bind to nuclear import receptors to allow for importation of the protien into the nucleus.<ref>Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K and Walter P. (2007) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science</ref><references /><br>
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Nuclear localization signals are sorting signals found on protiens to be imported into the nucleus. They are, unlike most sorting sequences, not subjected the being cleaved off after importation- due to the fact that many protiens are imported and exported from the nucleus several times. Because of this it is likely that nuclear localisation sequences are likely to form loops or patches rather than being found on a terminus. Nuclear localisation sequences bind to [[nuclear import receptors]]nuclear import receptors to allow for importation of the protien into the nucleus.<ref>Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K and Walter P. (2007) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science</ref><references /><br>
  
 
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Revision as of 14:32, 29 November 2013

Nuclear localization signals are sorting signals found on protiens to be imported into the nucleus. They are, unlike most sorting sequences, not subjected the being cleaved off after importation- due to the fact that many protiens are imported and exported from the nucleus several times. Because of this it is likely that nuclear localisation sequences are likely to form loops or patches rather than being found on a terminus. Nuclear localisation sequences bind to nuclear import receptorsnuclear import receptors to allow for importation of the protien into the nucleus.[1]
  1. Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, Raff M, Roberts K and Walter P. (2007) Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th edition, New York: Garland Science

 

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