Nucleoside

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A nucleoside is a unit made up of a pentose [[Sugar|sugar]] (ribose or deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous [[Base|base]] (purine or pyrimidine), which are attatched by a ß N-[[Glycosidic bond|glycosidic linkage]] (the base is above the plane of the sugar). The sugar will be either [[Ribose|ribose]] (for [[RNA|RNA]] nucleosides) or [[Deoxyribose|deoxyribose]] (for [[DNA|DNA]] nucleosides). If the base is a [[Purine|purine]], then it is attached to C-1' by N-9, and if the base is a [[Pyrimidine|pyrimidine]] then it is attached to C-1' by N-1.  
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A nucleoside is a unit made up of a [[Pentose|pentose]] [[Sugar|sugar]] (ribose or deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous [[Base|base]] (purine or pyrimidine), which are attatched by a ß N-[[Glycosidic bond|glycosidic linkage]] (the base is above the plane of the sugar). The sugar will be either [[Ribose|ribose]] (for [[RNA|RNA]] nucleosides) or [[Deoxyribose|deoxyribose]] (for [[DNA|DNA]] nucleosides). If the base is a [[Purine|purine]], then it is attached to C-1' by N-9, and if the base is a [[Pyrimidine|pyrimidine]] then it is attached to C-1' by N-1.  
  
There are four nucleoside units in [[RNA|RNA]] - [[Adenosine|adenosine]], [[Guanosine|guanosine]], [[Cytidine|cytidine]] and [[Uridine|uridine]]. The four nucleoside units in [[DNA|DNA]] are called [[Deoxyadenosine|deoxyadenosine]], [[Deoxyguanosine|deoxyguanosine]], [[Deoxycytidine|deoxycytidine]] and [[Thymidine|thymidine]]. A nucleoside can have a [[Phosphate|phosphate]] group attached to the C-5' through a [[Condensation reaction|condensation reaction]], producing a [[Nucleotide|nucleotide]], a [[Monomer|monomer]] of [[Nucleic acid|nucleic acid]]<ref>Berg et al, Biochemistry, 6th Edition, New York: W.H. Freeman and Company, 2007</ref><ref>Berg JM, Tymoczko JL and Stryer L, 2012, Biochemistry 7th edition, NY, W. H Freeman and Company, page 115</ref>.
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There are four nucleoside units in [[RNA|RNA]] - [[Adenosine|adenosine]], [[Guanosine|guanosine]], [[Cytidine|cytidine]] and [[Uridine|uridine]]. The four nucleoside units in [[DNA|DNA]] are called [[Deoxyadenosine|deoxyadenosine]], [[Deoxyguanosine|deoxyguanosine]], [[Deoxycytidine|deoxycytidine]] and [[Thymidine|thymidine]]. A nucleoside can have a [[Phosphate|phosphate]] group attached to the C-5' through a [[Condensation reaction|condensation reaction]], producing a [[Nucleotide|nucleotide]], a [[Monomer|monomer]] of [[Nucleic acid|nucleic acid]]<ref>Berg et al, Biochemistry, 6th Edition, New York: W.H. Freeman and Company, 2007</ref><ref>Berg JM, Tymoczko JL and Stryer L, 2012, Biochemistry 7th edition, NY, W. H Freeman and Company, page 115</ref>.  
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Latest revision as of 00:40, 10 December 2018

A nucleoside is a unit made up of a pentose sugar (ribose or deoxyribose) and a nitrogenous base (purine or pyrimidine), which are attatched by a ß N-glycosidic linkage (the base is above the plane of the sugar). The sugar will be either ribose (for RNA nucleosides) or deoxyribose (for DNA nucleosides). If the base is a purine, then it is attached to C-1' by N-9, and if the base is a pyrimidine then it is attached to C-1' by N-1.

There are four nucleoside units in RNA - adenosine, guanosine, cytidine and uridine. The four nucleoside units in DNA are called deoxyadenosine, deoxyguanosine, deoxycytidine and thymidine. A nucleoside can have a phosphate group attached to the C-5' through a condensation reaction, producing a nucleotide, a monomer of nucleic acid[1][2].

References

  1. Berg et al, Biochemistry, 6th Edition, New York: W.H. Freeman and Company, 2007
  2. Berg JM, Tymoczko JL and Stryer L, 2012, Biochemistry 7th edition, NY, W. H Freeman and Company, page 115
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