Rattus norvegicus

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''Rattus norvegicus ''is a brown lab rat also known as the Norway rat.  
 
''Rattus norvegicus ''is a brown lab rat also known as the Norway rat.  
  
They are a commonly used [[model organism|model organism]]&nbsp;for studying different processes in humans, as they can mimic human diseases pretty well<ref>DNA Learning Centre. Rat (Rattus norvegicus). [Cited 22/10/2018]. Available from: https://www.dnalc.org/view/1717-Rat-Rattus-norvegicus-.html</ref>.  
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They are a commonly used [[Model organism|model organism]]&nbsp;for studying different processes in humans, as they can mimic human diseases pretty well<ref>DNA Learning Centre. Rat (Rattus norvegicus). [Cited 22/10/2018]. Available from: https://www.dnalc.org/view/1717-Rat-Rattus-norvegicus-.html</ref>.  
  
 
It is also the first mammalian species that was utilised for sceintific reserach, hence is the the most extensively used model animal in research.  
 
It is also the first mammalian species that was utilised for sceintific reserach, hence is the the most extensively used model animal in research.  
  
It is a conveneient model organism due to its smaller size, rapid life cycle, similarity to humans and they are relatively affordable. There are also a large number of mutants available and you can even manipulate the [[genome|genome]].  
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It is a conveneient model organism due to its smaller size, rapid life cycle, similarity to humans and they are relatively affordable. There are also a large number of mutants available and you can even manipulate the [[Genome|genome]].  
  
They have been used for a vast array of research including aging, addiction, cancer, genomics, cardiovascular diseases and many more<ref>Genome Research. Functional Genomics and Rat Models. [Cited 22/10/18]; Available at: https://genome.cshlp.org/content/9/11/1013.full.html</ref>.  
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They have been used for a vast array of researc h including aging, addiction, cancer, genomics, cardiovascular diseases and many more<ref>Genome Research. Functional Genomics and Rat Models. [Cited 22/10/18]; Available at: https://genome.cshlp.org/content/9/11/1013.full.html</ref>.  
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The first known research done in Rattatus norvegicus was in America in 1908 by Elmer McCollun Day,&nbsp;<ref>Day, Harry G. (1974). "Elmer Verner McCollum". Biographical memoirs. National Academy of Sciences (U.S.). 45: 291. PMID 11615648</ref>&nbsp;they originally used them for trials for basicnutrition. A futher experiment took place the determine protien digestion by Thomas Burr Osbourne.&nbsp;
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
<references />
 
<references />

Revision as of 15:39, 24 October 2018

Rattus norvegicus is a brown lab rat also known as the Norway rat.

They are a commonly used model organism for studying different processes in humans, as they can mimic human diseases pretty well[1].

It is also the first mammalian species that was utilised for sceintific reserach, hence is the the most extensively used model animal in research.

It is a conveneient model organism due to its smaller size, rapid life cycle, similarity to humans and they are relatively affordable. There are also a large number of mutants available and you can even manipulate the genome.

They have been used for a vast array of researc h including aging, addiction, cancer, genomics, cardiovascular diseases and many more[2].

The first known research done in Rattatus norvegicus was in America in 1908 by Elmer McCollun Day, [3] they originally used them for trials for basicnutrition. A futher experiment took place the determine protien digestion by Thomas Burr Osbourne. 

References

  1. DNA Learning Centre. Rat (Rattus norvegicus). [Cited 22/10/2018]. Available from: https://www.dnalc.org/view/1717-Rat-Rattus-norvegicus-.html
  2. Genome Research. Functional Genomics and Rat Models. [Cited 22/10/18]; Available at: https://genome.cshlp.org/content/9/11/1013.full.html
  3. Day, Harry G. (1974). "Elmer Verner McCollum". Biographical memoirs. National Academy of Sciences (U.S.). 45: 291. PMID 11615648
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