Rosalind Franklin

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Rosalind Franklin was a molecular biologist who's work with X-rays lead to the discovery of the structure of DNA; revolutionising genetics.  
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Rosalind Franklin was a molecular biologist who's work with X-rays lead to the discovery of the structure of [[DNA|DNA]]; revolutionising genetics.  
  
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Franklin was born in 1920 in London. In 1951 she began working at King's College London where her determination lead to x-ray photographs which provided [[Watson_and_Crick|Watson and Crick]] with basis for the structure of [[DNA|DNA]].&nbsp;
  
Franklin was born in 1920 in London. In 1951 she began working at King's College London where her determination lead to x-ray photographs which provided Watson and Crick with basis for the structure of DNA.&nbsp;  
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At the time she was not credited for her pioneering work, it was not until after her death, ironically cause by radiation exposure, that she was given a Nobel prize&nbsp;<ref>http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/franklin.html</ref>.
  
At the time she was not credited for her pioneering work, it was not until after her death, ironically cause by radiation exposure, that she was given a Nobel prize.&nbsp;<ref>http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/franklin.html</ref>
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=== References  ===
 
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Revision as of 21:10, 21 October 2012

Rosalind Franklin was a molecular biologist who's work with X-rays lead to the discovery of the structure of DNA; revolutionising genetics.

Franklin was born in 1920 in London. In 1951 she began working at King's College London where her determination lead to x-ray photographs which provided Watson and Crick with basis for the structure of DNA

At the time she was not credited for her pioneering work, it was not until after her death, ironically cause by radiation exposure, that she was given a Nobel prize [1].

References

  1. http://www.sdsc.edu/ScienceWomen/franklin.html
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