Transposon

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(I added more detail to the cut and paste mechanism described in class 2 transposons)
 
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*'''Class I transposons''' - also called [[Retrotransposons|retrotransposons]] - they make up 40% of the human genome. They move from one genome to another via a 'copy and paste' mechanism in which an RNA intermediate is transcribed from the retrotransposon, then made into cDNA via [[Reverse transcriptase|reverse transcriptase]] where it binds to the recipient DNA. The original genomic region containing the retrotransposon is not deleted.  
 
*'''Class I transposons''' - also called [[Retrotransposons|retrotransposons]] - they make up 40% of the human genome. They move from one genome to another via a 'copy and paste' mechanism in which an RNA intermediate is transcribed from the retrotransposon, then made into cDNA via [[Reverse transcriptase|reverse transcriptase]] where it binds to the recipient DNA. The original genomic region containing the retrotransposon is not deleted.  
*'''Class II transposons - '''move from one genome to another via a 'cut and paste' mechanism<ref>Kimball’s Biology Pages. Transposons: Mobile DNA. 2018 [cited 15/11/18]; Available From: http://www.biology-pages.info/T/Transposons.html</ref>. The mechanism is to produce the enzyme protein transposase which will cleave DNA in a staggered sticky end cut. DNA polymerase will then re-attach the transposon to another place in the genome<ref>Scitable. Transponsons: The Jumping Genes. 2014 [cited 09/12/2018]; fckLRAvailable from: https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/transposons-the-jumping-genes-518</ref>
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*'''Class II transposons - '''move from one genome to another via a 'cut and paste' mechanism<ref>Kimball’s Biology Pages. Transposons: Mobile DNA. 2018 [cited 15/11/18]; Available From: http://www.biology-pages.info/T/Transposons.html</ref>. The mechanism is to produce the enzyme protein transposase which will cleave DNA in a staggered sticky end cut. DNA polymerase will then re-attach the transposon to another place in the genome<ref>Scitable. Transponsons: The Jumping Genes. 2014 [cited 09/12/2018]; fckLRAvailable from: https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/transposons-the-jumping-genes-518</ref>.
  
 
=== References  ===
 
=== References  ===
  
 
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Latest revision as of 17:46, 9 December 2018

Transposons are genes that can move. They have a specific target site,allowing them to move or 'jump' into different DNA sites[1]. Transposons leave copies of themselves wherever they stop. Half of the human genome consists of these 'jumping genes'[2]. They are important for genomic variation and evolution in organisms. Transposons are subdivided into 2 classes:

References

  1. Bruce Alberts,Alexander Johnson,Julian Lewis,Martin Raff,Keith Roberts and Peter Walter (2002) Molecular Biology Of The Cell,4th edition,New York: Garland Science.p287
  2. Hardin, J. Bertoni, G. Kleinsmith, L (2012). Becker's World of the Cell. 8th ed. San Francisco: Pearson: 527
  3. Kimball’s Biology Pages. Transposons: Mobile DNA. 2018 [cited 15/11/18]; Available From: http://www.biology-pages.info/T/Transposons.html
  4. Scitable. Transponsons: The Jumping Genes. 2014 [cited 09/12/2018]; fckLRAvailable from: https://www.nature.com/scitable/topicpage/transposons-the-jumping-genes-518
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