Type 1 diabetes

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Type 1 diabetes is an [[Autoimmune_disease|autoimmune disease]] where your own body attacks the cells of the [[Pancreas|pancreas]], it is thought to be inherited, i.e. run in families. This leads to an inability to produce the [[Hormone|hormone]] [[Insulin|insulin]] which is essential for the control of [[Blood_glucose_level|blood glucose levels]]. Insulin is released from the [[Pancreatic_beta_cells|beta cells of the islets of langerhans]] in the pancreas, in response to a high glucose concentration, e.g. after eating a meal. This release of insulin causes the [[Liver|liver]] to convert this glucose into glycogen in the process known as [[Glycogenesis|glycogenesis]]. In a person who doesn't suffer from diabetes, this response is immediate and helps cope with the influx of glucose. This response is vital in maintinaing [[Homeostasis|homeostasis]]. However in a person suffering from type 1 diabetes, this response is not present.
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Type 1 diabetes is an [[Autoimmune disease|autoimmune disease]] where your own body attacks the cells of the [[Pancreas|pancreas]], it is thought to be inherited, i.e. run in families. This leads to an inability to produce the [[Hormone|hormone]] [[Insulin|insulin]] which is essential for the control of [[Blood glucose level|blood glucose levels]]. Insulin is released from the [[Pancreatic beta cells|beta cells of the islets of langerhans]] in the pancreas, in response to a high glucose concentration, e.g. after eating a meal. This release of insulin causes the [[Liver|liver]] to convert this glucose into glycogen in the process known as [[Glycogenesis|glycogenesis]]. In a person who doesn't suffer from diabetes, this response is immediate and helps cope with the influx of glucose. This response is vital in maintaining [[Homeostasis|homeostasis]]. However, in a person suffering from type 1 diabetes, this response is not present.

Revision as of 10:08, 6 December 2017

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where your own body attacks the cells of the pancreas, it is thought to be inherited, i.e. run in families. This leads to an inability to produce the hormone insulin which is essential for the control of blood glucose levels. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the islets of langerhans in the pancreas, in response to a high glucose concentration, e.g. after eating a meal. This release of insulin causes the liver to convert this glucose into glycogen in the process known as glycogenesis. In a person who doesn't suffer from diabetes, this response is immediate and helps cope with the influx of glucose. This response is vital in maintaining homeostasis. However, in a person suffering from type 1 diabetes, this response is not present.

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