Anode

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An anode is the positive terminal from an electrical circuit. Due to conventional current, the anode is seen as the terminal in which positive charge is flowing out from, however positive charge does not flow, and it is actually the electrons leaving the cathode (negative end) and flowing into the anode [1]. Ions are attracted to either of the electrodes, these are anions and cations. Anions are negatively charged ions and are attracted to the anode; cations are positively charged ions and are attracted to the cathode. At the anode, when it is in an ionic solution, or in molten metals, (somewhere where ions are free to move) the negative ions that are attracted to the anode will give up their electrons to the anode. This is oxidation as the ion is losing electrons. At the cathode where the positive ions are attracted, the ions will receive electrons from the cathode. This is reduction as the ion is gaining electrons.[2] See also x-ray anodes [3]

Refernces:

  1. http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anode
  2. http://www.chemguide.co.uk/CIE/section6/learningb.html
  3. http://www.torrscientific.co.uk/index.php/products/x-ray-anodes
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