Phosphatidylethanolamine

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Phosphatidylethanolamine is one of the four main phospholipids found within the lipid bilayer of mammalian plasma membranes. Three of these integral four are derived from glycerol however, the fourth, sphingomyelin is derived from the amino acid serine. These phospholipids within the membrane are described as being amphipathic – they have a hydrophilic (water-loving) head and a hydrophobic (water-hating) tail.

The phosphoglyceride (glycerol derivative) structure consists of a three carbon glycerol backbone and two fatty acid tails esterified to neighbouring glycerol carbon atoms. The inconsistency of the polar phosphate head allows for the construction of a variety of phosphoglycerides for plasma membrane assembly, however, the three main phosphoglycerides are phophatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine.[1] The hydrobicity of the fatty acid chain tails creates the bilayer effect as they avoid the water by packaging themselves with the hydrophobic heads on both the basolateral and apical membranes. These tails often include C=C double bonds which ‘kink’ the tail and allow for fluidity within the plasma membrane [2].

References

  1. Alberts et. Al. (2008), Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th Edition, (618-619) New York, Garland Science, Taylor and Francis Group
  2. Alberts et. Al. (2008), Molecular Biology of the Cell, 5th Edition, (618-619) New York, Garland Science, Taylor and Francis Group


Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox