Sodium-glucose symporter

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Sodium-glucose Symporter is a transmembrane protein and is an example of sodium-driven Secondary active transport that occurs in the epithelial cells of the small intestines [1]. The sodium-glucose symporter is found on the Apical membrane of the epithelal cells [2]. The sodium and glucose bind to the symporter and are simultaneously both co-transported into the epithelial cells. The sodium driven-glucose symporter uses the potential free energy stored in the sodium electrochemical gradient (low sodium concentration inside the epithelial cells) established by Sodium-potassium pump [3]. Therefore, the sodium influx from the lumen to the epithelial cell is coupled with glucose transport.

References

  1. Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of The Cell (6th Edition), Garland Sciences; New York: 2015 (page 605)
  2. Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of The Cell (6th Edition), Garland science; New York: 2015 (page 605)
  3. Alberts et al. Molecular Biology of The Cell (6th Edition), Garland Science; New York: 2015 (page 606-608)
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