Glycerine

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Glycerine (also known as Glycerol or Glycerin) is a colourless, viscous, odourless fluid that is mainly used in pharmaceutical companies. Due to its sweet taste and low toxicity, it is ideal for cough syrups and other medicines.

Contents

Structure

Glycerol contains 3 hydroxyl groups, which make it water soluble.

Its molecular formula is CH2(OH)CH(OH)CH2OH

Production

Glycerol is mainly produced as a byproduct in other processes, such as saponification of fats (soap making), as glycerol forms the core of triglycerides.

It is also produced as a by-product in biodiesel production.

Metabolism

Gluconeogenisis occurs in the liver, and is when the body uses glycerol to make glucose in fasting conditions.

Glycerol is one of the 3 main carbon sources in the body for gluconeogenesis. The glycerol is released from the adipose stores of triacylglycerol and phosphorylated into glycerol-3-P. Glycerol-3-P is then converted to dihydroxyacetone-P, which then produces glucose[1].

References

  1. Marks, L., Marks' Basic Medical Biochemistry A Clinical Approach, 4th Edition, page 562.
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