Nitrogenous base

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Nitrogenous bases are found in nucleotides. There are four different nucleotides in DNA: Adenine (A), Cytosine (C), Guanine (G) and Thymine (T)[1]. There is also a base called Uracil, however, this only occurs in RNA. These are then grouped as either a Purine (A and G) or a Pyrimidine (C and T in DNA and U in RNA). A Purine always pairs with a pyrimidine. Purines are also bigger in size than pyrimidines. Nitrogenous bases are the key to base pairing. A will always bind with T in DNA unless in RNA where A will bind with U. G and C will always bind together regardless whether it is DNA or RNA[2]. The nitrogenous base is one of the three components of a nucleotide which in turn join up to form DNA. The three components of a nucleotide are a phosphate group, a pentose sugar and a nitrogenous bas [3].

References

  1. Alberts, BA,Johnson, AJ,Lewis, JL, Raff,MR, Roberts, KR, Walters, PW. 2008. The Cell. Fifth Edition. 197-198.
  2. Alberts, BA,Johnson, AJ,Lewis, JL, Raff,MR, Roberts, KR, Walters, PW. 2008. The Cell. Fifth Edition. 197-198.
  3. Alberts, BA,Johnson, AJ,Lewis, JL, Raff,MR, Roberts, KR, Walters, PW. 2008. The Cell. Fifth Edition.116-117.

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