Sticky ends

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Sticky ends are fragments of DNA where one strand, after being cleaved by restriction enzymes, is left over hanging another strand. It is cleaved assymetrically and can leave a 5' or a 3' overhang. These overhangs are termed 'sticky' because they can easily bind to free nucleotides [1]. Restriction enzymes can also symmetrically cleave DNA strands to form blunt ends. In recombinant DNA techniques when producing a recombinant plasmid the same restriction endonuclease is used to cut both the plasmid DNA and the gene of interest so that they have complimentary sticky ends that will anneal to produce a recombinant plasmid.

Some examples of Restriction endonucleases that cut to create 'sticky ends' are [2]:

References

  1. http://www.genscript.com/product_003/molecular_biology_glossary/id/12153/category/glossary/Sticky_ends.html
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_restriction_enzyme_cutting_sites:_E-F#Whole_list_navigation

Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox