Fumarate

From The School of Biomedical Sciences Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Fumarate is a four carbon compound involved in the citric acid cycle which takes place in the mitochondria during aerobic respiration. It is formed by the oxidation of succinate which is catalysed by succinate dehydrogenase along with the help of FAD which accepts the hydrogens released to form FADH2. FAD is used as the hydrogen acceptor instead of NAD+ because the free energy change is insufficent to reduce NAD+[1]. Fumarate then goes on to form L-malate. This occurs by the hydration of fumarate by fumarase. Fumarase achieves this by the addition of both H+ and OH-, this is known as stereospecific trans addition[2]

References

  1. Berg, Jeremy M., John L. Tymoczko, and Lubert Stryer. "The Citric Acid Cycle Oxidizes Two-Carbon Units." Biochemistry. Seventh ed. New York: W.H. Freeman, 2012. 527. Print.
  2. Berg, Jeremy M., John L. Tymoczko, and Lubert Stryer. "The Citric Acid Cycle Oxidizes Two-Carbon Units." Biochemistry. Seventh ed. New York: W.H. Freeman, 2012. 528. Print.
Personal tools
Namespaces
Variants
Actions
Navigation
Toolbox